Professional Learning Opportunities

For the upcoming school year conferences, workshops and events will be coherent with the Superintendent Leadership Quality Standard competencies from Alberta Education  with a focus on supporting awareness and understanding leading to a commitment to action for building capacity.

The Superintendent Leadership Quality Standard*   Quality superintendent leadership occurs when the superintendent’s ongoing analysis of the context, and the superintendent’s decisions about what leadership knowledge abilities to apply, result in quality school leadership, quality teaching and optimum learning for all students in the school authority.  *Alberta Education – July 2016 Draft

Click on a competency to access online and face to face learning opportunities.

Building Effective Relationships

A superintendent establishes a welcoming, caring, respectful and safe learning environment by building positive and productive relationships with members of the school community and the local community.

Achievement of this competency is demonstrated by indicators such as:

  1. collaborating with community and provincial agencies to address the needs of students and their families;
  2. employing team-building strategies and using solution-focused processes to resolve challenges;
  3. building and sustaining relationships with First Nations, Métis and Inuit parents/guardians, Elders, local leaders and community members;
  4. modeling ethical leadership practices, based on integrity and objectivity;
  5. establishing constructive relationships with students, staff, school councils, parents/guardians, employee organizations, the education ministry and other stakeholder organizations; and
  6. facilitating the meaningful participation of members of the school community and local community in decision-making.

Learning Opportunities

Modeling Commitments to Professional Learning

A superintendent engages in career-long professional learning and ongoing critical reflection, identifying and acting on research-informed opportunities for enhancing leadership, teaching, and learning.

Achievement of this competency is demonstrated by a number of indicators, such as:

  1. communicating a philosophy of education that is student-centered and based on sound principles of effective teaching and leadership;
  2. collaborating with teachers, principals and other superintendents to build professional capacities and expertise;
  3. actively seeking out feedback and information from a variety of sources to enhance leadership practice;
  4. seeking and critically-reviewing educational research and applying it to decisions and practices, as appropriate;
  5. providing leadership to support school authority research initiatives, where appropriate; and
  6. engaging the members of the school authority to establish a shared understanding of current trends and priorities in the education system.

Learning Opportunities

Visionary Leadership

A superintendent engages with the school community in implementing a vision of a preferred future for student success, based on common values and beliefs.

Achievement of this competency is demonstrated by indicators such as:

  1. ensuring that the vision is informed by research on effective learning, teaching and leadership;
  2. promoting innovation and continuous improvement by building structures and developing strategies to support staff in professional collaboration;
  3. promoting in the school community a common understanding of and support for the school authority’s goals, priorities, and strategic initiatives; and
  4. ensuring that the vision expressed in the school authority’s education plan is responsive to the ongoing review of the school authority’s achievements, meets all requirements identified in provincial legislation, and incorporates the school community’s perspectives.

Learning Opportunities

Leading Learning

A superintendent establishes and sustains a learning culture in the school community that promotes ongoing critical reflection on practice, shared responsibility for student success and continuous improvement.

Achievement of this competency is demonstrated by indicators such as:

  1. fostering in the school community equality and respect with respect to age, ethnicity, culture, religious belief, gender, gender identity, gender expression, physical ability, cognitive ability, family status and sexual orientation;
  2. providing learning opportunities, based on research-informed principles of effective teaching, learning and leadership, to build the capacity of all members of the school community to fulfill their educational roles;
  3. ensuring that all instruction in the school authority addresses learning outcomes and goals outlined in provincial legislation and programs of study;
  4. promoting collaboration, critical thinking and innovation in the school community;
  5. ensuring that staff have access to resources, programs and expertise to support them in meeting their professional responsibilities and in addressing the learning needs of all students;
  6. building principals’ capacities and holding them accountable for providing instructional leadership through effective support, supervision and evaluation practices; and
  7. ensuring student assessment and evaluation practices in the school authority are fair, appropriate, evidence-informed and used to enhance learning, teaching and leadership.

Learning Opportunities

Ensuring First Nations, Métis and Inuit Education for All Students

A superintendent establishes the structures and provides the resources necessary for the school community to acquire and apply foundational knowledge about First Nations, Métis and Inuit for the benefit of all students.

Achievement of this competency is demonstrated by indicators such as:

  1. supporting staff in accessing the professional learning and capacity-building needed to meet the learning needs of First Nations, Métis, Inuit and all other students;
  2. engaging and collaborating with neighbouring First Nations and Métis leaders, organizations and communities to optimize learning success and development of First Nations, Métis, Inuit and all other students;
  3. understanding historical, social, economic, and political implications of:
    • treaties and agreements with First Nations;
    • legislation and agreements negotiated with Métis; and
    • residential schools and their legacy;
  4. aligning school authority resources and building organizational capacity to support First Nations, Métis and Inuit student achievement; and
  5. pursuing opportunities and engaging in practices to facilitate reconciliation within the school community.

Learning Opportunities

School Authority Operations and Resources

A superintendent directs school authority operations and strategically allocates resources in the interests of all students and in alignment with the school authority’s goals and priorities.

Achievement of this competency is demonstrated by indicators such as:

  1. providing direction on fiscal and resource management in accordance with all statutory, regulatory and school authority requirements;
  2. ensuring effective alignment of the school authority’s human resources to achieve the school authority’s education plan;
  3. delegating responsibility to staff, where appropriate, to enhance operational efficiency and effectiveness;
  4. providing for the support, ongoing supervision and evaluation of all staff members in relation to their respective professional responsibilities;
  5. establishing data-informed strategic planning and decision-making processes that are responsive to changing contexts;
  6. respecting cultural diversity and appreciating differing perspectives expressed in the school community;
  7. recognizing student and staff accomplishments; and
  8. implementing programs and procedures for the effective management of human resources in support of mentorship, capacity-building and succession planning.

Learning Opportunities

Supporting Effective Governance

A superintendent of schools as referred to in the School Act, as chief executive officer of the board and chief education officer of the school authority, provides the board with information, advice and support required for the fulfillment of its governance role, and reports to the Minister on all matters required of the superintendent as identified in the School Act and other provincial legislation.

Achievement of this competency is demonstrated by indicators such as:

  1. establishing and sustaining a productive working relationship with the board, based on mutual trust, respect and integrity;
  2. ensuring that all students and staff are provided with a welcoming, caring, respectful and safe learning environment that respects diversity and fosters a sense of belonging;
  3. ensuring that all students in the school authority have the opportunity to meet the standards of education set by the Minister of Education;
  4. ensuring that the board’s plans, resource allocations, strategies and procedures lead to the achievement of its goals and priorities;
  5. ensuring that the board’s fiscal and resource management is in accordance with all statutory, regulatory and board requirements;
  6. supporting the board in the fulfilment of its governance functions in the fiduciary, strategic and generative realms;
  7. implementing board policies and supporting the regular review and evaluation of their impact;
  8. ensuring the support, ongoing supervision and evaluation of all staff members in relation to their respective professional responsibilities;
  9. facilitating collaboration among the board, staff and First Nations, Métis and Inuit leaders, organizations and communities to establish strategic policy directions in support of First Nations, Métis and Inuit student achievement and development;
  10. building the capacity of the board and staff to predict, communicate and respond to emergent circumstances, including emergency readiness and crisis management, and to political, social, economic, legal and cultural contexts and trends;
  11. supporting the board in its engagement with the school community to develop a vision of a preferred future for student success;
  12. facilitating ongoing public communication about the board’s operations and the achievement of its goals and priorities; and
  13. promoting constructive relations between the board and staff, as well as provincial authorities, post-secondary institutions and education stakeholder organizations.

Learning Opportunities